Date: 2011-10-26 10:54 am (UTC)
pne: A picture of a plush toy, halfway between a duck and a platypus, with a green body and a yellow bill and feet. (Default)
From: [personal profile] pne
I've seen these on dim sum menus, as 沙爹東風螺 (shā diē dōng fēng luó), which are sea snails in satay sauce, and as 咖哩東風螺 (kā lī dōng fēng luó), which are sea snails in curry sauce (kā lī being a phonetic transcription of "curry").

And given that the word satay is of Indonesian/Malay origin (possibly originally from Tamil, but), I wouldn't be surprised if shā diē is a phonetic transcription (probably in a southern dialect such as Hokkien or possibly Cantonese, rather than Mandarin) of satay.

(Chinese Wikipedia has satay sauce under the lemma of 沙茶醬, but if I'm reading the lede right, it says that in Guangdong province, it's called 沙爹醬.)

東北 (Dōngběi), a region [...]. It includes the three northeastern provinces of China: Jílín, Liáoníng, and Hēilóngjiāng. 北 (běi) means "north", so Dōngběi is literally "east-north"

Japan also has a region of that name (read Tōhoku there), located (unsurprisingly) in the north-east of the country.

I thought Korea might, too, but searches for "Dongbuk" don't pop up anything interesting. (And 동북 dongbuk on Korean Wikipedia redirects to 둥베이 dungbei, referring to the Chinese region.)

Other place names you might see on a menu are 廣東 (Guǎngdōng), the southern province which is the home of Cantonese cuisine (including dim sum)

I imagine that Guǎngdōng is where the name "Canton" comes from.

Even though Canton, the city, is called 廣州 Guǎngzhōu.
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