kake: The word "菜單" (Chinese for "menu") in various shades of purple. (菜單)
[personal profile] kake

Last week I posted about pig's ears with chilli oil, and mentioned that although I hadn't been able to find any recipes for this in English, I hoped to be able to link to a Chinese one in translation soon. [personal profile] pulchritude has kindly translated a recipe from MeiShiDao for me, and here it is! (Follow that link for the Chinese version, and photos.)

Text in [square brackets] is an aside from either me or [personal profile] pulchritude. I have done some light copyediting (and hopefully have not introduced any mistakes).

Shredded pig's ear and cucumber in chilli oil

Main ingredients
  • one pig's ear, simmered in a flavourful liquid until cooked [you could use master sauce, or a mixture of soy sauce and water; as noted last week, about 20 minutes is enough time to cook a pig's ear to a good level of crunchiness]
  • one cucumber
Seasonings
  • garlic
  • salt
  • Sichuan pepper
  • dried red chillies
  • "numbing-spicy" oil [made during the course of this recipe]
  • light soy sauce [light-coloured soy sauce, not low-sodium]
  • Shanxi aged vinegar [one of China's four famous vinegars; you can subsitute Chinese black vinegar, available at most Chinese supermarkets]
  • chilli oil [made during the course of this recipe]
Preparing the pig's ear
  1. Let the pig's ear cool [after simmering it in the master sauce].
  2. Place your knife at a 45 degree angle.
  3. Slice the pig's ear diagonally into julienne strips.
Finishing the dish
  1. Put the julienned pig ear into a large bowl.
  2. Wash the cucumber, cut into julienne strips, and add to the pig ear.
  3. Peel the garlic and put it into a [small, separate] bowl with a bit of salt, then use the end of a rolling pin to crush it. [Or just use a pestle and mortar.]
  4. [Making the "numbing-spicy" oil.] Put some oil in a pan, then add the Sichuan pepper and the dried chillies (cut into a few pieces each). Fry until the colour changes and the aroma is fragrant, then strain to remove the solids.
  5. [Turning this into chilli oil.] Add the flavoured oil to the small bowl with the crushed garlic in.
  6. Add light soy sauce, vinegar, and salt to the small bowl, and mix well to create a dressing.
  7. Pour this dressing into the large bowl.
  8. Use chopsticks to mix everything evenly.

Please note that I haven't personally tried this recipe! But it looks potentially tastier than the one I made up myself — I'm particularly thinking that the simmering in master sauce would add a lot more flavour than my simple simmering in water.

Date: 2011-11-29 07:46 pm (UTC)
pulchritude: (2)
From: [personal profile] pulchritude
I remember that you made a post about 鹵, but I just can't seem to find it - the term itself doesn't refer exclusively to master sauce and is defined in my (Chinese-Chinese) dictionary as 'using brine, soy sauce, and similarly concentrated liquids to make food'. When my family uses the term, we use it almost always to refer to simmering in a mixture of soy sauce and water, for example.

Date: 2011-11-29 09:18 pm (UTC)
pulchritude: (5)
From: [personal profile] pulchritude
Oh...I thought you did for some reason, my bad. XD;;; My memory is getting poorer and poorer >_>

And yeah, I think that probably works :)

Tags

December 2012

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags