Wednesday Ramblings

Feb. 22nd, 2017 11:50 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today we met up with my folks in Champaign-Urbana.  So they have their batch of poetry from the half-price sale.  \o/  We had lunch together too.

The main goal was making a major stockup run at Sam's Club.  We got a ton of food, some garden soil for leveling low spots, and a very cool garden cart.  We'll be making sloppy joe mix and keema, having picked up ingredients for those recipes.

We also stopped at Harvest Market.  They had more jackfruit, yay!  \o/  These were whole, about the size of a watermelon, but could be cut, so I got three big slices.  My plan is to make bread pudding and ice cream.  One of the employees also tipped us to the availability of barbecue jackfruit, which is made from the green fruit, so we got some of that to try also.  :D  They also had some shortbread cooking which turned out to be amazingly tasty and tender.  We did not, strictly speaking, need to buy a carton of cookies and half a gallon of farm-fresh chocolate milk, but after several hours of hiking around and buying healthy food, we decided that we deserved a treat.

Poem: "A Slow Ripening Fruit"

Feb. 22nd, 2017 07:59 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem came out of the December 6, 2016 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] kyleri. It also fills the "Must Be Doin' Somethin' Right" square in my 12-1-16 card for the IPod Shuffle Music fest. This poem has been sponsored by [livejournal.com profile] starcat_jewel. It belongs to the Shiv thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )

Two Great Vids from the Festivids

Feb. 22nd, 2017 03:51 pm
jesse_the_k: Macro photo of left eye of my mostly black border collie mutt (Default)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Vidding defined )

Although the annual Festivids discussion and commenting happen on Dreamwidth (mirrored on Livejournal, Tumblr, IRC and so forth), the vids themselves are posted in many places. In my brief experience, the most lasting is Festivids' own site.

For now, all the 2016 Festivids are here
http://fv-poster.dreamwidth.org/336383.html

and for the future, visit
http://www.festivids.net/festivids/festivids-2016

The two highlights for me: A Better Son/Daughter and Get Better )
jack: (Default)
[personal profile] jack
I was reflecting further on my previous comments on meta-history in source control.

One use case I imagined was that you can rebase freely, and people who've pulled will have everything just work assuming they always pull rebase. But I may have been too pessimistic. A normal pull rebase may usually just cope with the sort of rebasing people are likely to have done upstream anyway.

The other question is, are you losing old history by rebasing older commits? Well, I don't suggest doing it for very old commits, but I guess, you're not losing any history for commits that were in releases.

Although that itself raises a reason to have a connection between the new branch and the old: you shouldn't be rebasing history prior to a release much (usually not at all. maybe to squash a commit to make git bisect work?) But if you do, you don't want too parallel branches with the same commit, you want to be able to see where the release was on the "good" history (assuming there's a commit which is file-identical to the original release commit), and fall back to the "original" history only if there's some problem.

And as I've said before, another thing I like is the idea that if you're rebasing, you don't have a command that says "do this whole magic thing in one step", you have a thing that says "construct a new branch one commit at a time from this existing branch, stopping when there's a problem", and there is no state needed to continue after resolving a problem, you just re-run the command on the partially-constructed new branch. And then can choose to throw away the old branch to tidy up, but that's not an inherent part of the commadn.

Reading Wednesday

Feb. 22nd, 2017 07:37 pm
rmc28: Rachel standing in front of the entrance to the London Eye pier (Default)
[personal profile] rmc28
What I've read: poetry
[personal profile] serene mentioned the poem-a-day email from Rattle and I signed up. I don't really feel I know or understand poetry very much, but these ones have stuck with me so far:
Shoveling Snow by Vicki L. Wilson
April Rain by Abigail Rose Cargo


What I've read: short fiction
I also recently subscribed to Daily Science Fiction which gets me a short story in my email on weekdays, so even if I'm not getting to anything else, I usually manage to read that.

Shop Talk by O. Hybridity
Grandma Heloise by KT Wagner
An Invasion in Seven Courses by Rene Sears

Two more novellas from the historical romance collection Gambled Away:
Raising the Stakes by Isabel Cooper: A 1930s con-artist accidentally summons elvish help when she wins a flute in a poker game; he helps her pull off a really big con.
Redeemed by Molly O'Keefe: A former army doctor and a former spy, brought together by a really nasty character and a high-stakes poker-game in the aftermath of the US Civil War.



Acquisitions: (so far entirely eyes-bigger-than-stomach-brain)
  • Daring Greatly by Brene Brown
  • Binti: Home by Nnedi Okorafor - sequel to Binti which I enjoyed very much
  • Stories of Your Life and Others - anthology by Ted Chiang, including Story of Your Life, which has been made into the film Arrival
  • The Good Immigrant - anthology of essays by twenty British Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic writers and artists, includes this one by Riz Ahmed (played Bodhi Rook, the defecting cargo pilot in Star Wars: Rogue One; also as Riz MC was one of the artists on Immigrants (We Get The Job Done) - my favourite track from the Hamilton Mixtape)
  • Journeys - anthology of short fantasy stories

worklog

Feb. 22nd, 2017 06:27 pm
artsyhonker: a girl with glasses and purple shoulder-length hair (Default)
[personal profile] artsyhonker
Yesterday: packing, mostly, which involved lots of laundry and turning the radiators on specially to dry it. But in between that I found some poetry to add to Words for Songs, and another modern poet whose feed to follow. So there's that. I also found some bits and pieces to listen to on Bandcamp.

I think some of the issue for me with getting my academic reading and listening done is that I don't have regular, routine reading or listening times *at all*. So turning this DW account into a place that I do at least some of the reading, and trying to figure out how listening fits into a schedule, is a good thing. Academic research-like reading is going to be different than reading poetry on the internet, but just doing some work-related reading each day is stil better than nothing. Ideally, if I want these changes to stick, they're going to have to be organic and habitual, rather than attempting to do an immediate complete overhaul of my routines. And ideally, I do wnat these changes to stick beyond the PhD. Not reading enough poetry is the main reason I so often struggle to find the right words for a composition; not reading enough of the researchy, theoretical stuff is less obviously limiting, but being able to do self-directed intellectual study at a higher level than "hey, that book looks interesting" or "Oh crap I need to know about widgets, what does the internet say about them?" is going to serve me well no matter what I do. (The practical skills side of this I can already self-direct to an extent I'm fairly happy with, but it's a while since I pushed myself in the arena of learning information.)

Today I spent on the train to Aberdeen. I was going to transfer over to a new bullet journal but the train was too bumpy, and I was not concentrating well. So I mostly spent the journey reading non-PhD stuff, nodding off, and staring at the sea.

Going to have some supper, unpack, and then see how much of the BuJo transfer I can do before bed, and try to figure out what tomorrow's schedule is like -- it's some kind of postgraduate induction thing, with a lot of emphasis on experimental ethics committees. I think there's a concert in the evening, too.

It would be sensible for me to make a post here with things like the regular times of services at St Andrew's Episcopal, opening hours for various restaurants, and so on; I tend to forget while I'm away and no longer need the information, and as I'm currently getting through a bullet journal every 3 months (I have a lot of ideas, okay?), and it's the sort of thing that's useful to have but not crucial to have offline, it's more sensible to store some of that stuff in a bookmark.

Judaism and Special Needs

Feb. 22nd, 2017 12:18 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
[personal profile] gingicat tipped me to this online resource for Jewish teaching and special needs.  In addition to helping Jewish families with special needs, this is also useful for anyone who has Jewish friends.
oursin: Photograph of small impressionistic metal figurine seated reading a book (Reader)
[personal profile] oursin

What I read

I finished Truth is not sober, and while a lot of these stories were clearly responding to particular issues of the time, at which some worked better than others as actual stories for the ages, there was something very delightful indeed about coming across a trove of Holtby's fiction that I hadn't already read.

JA Jance, Judgement Call (2012) - clearly I've been falling behind on the Joanna Brady mysteries, because I discovered 2 I hadn't read available in ebook and one crossover with another of her series characters that I don't much care for. I'd forgotten how good they are, or maybe this was a particularly strong one.

Ellen Klages, Passing Strange (2017) - ok, it is a novella, but I thought this was a little on the slight side, might be just me.

On the go

Still trucking on with the massive Inchbald biography, which is perhaps a little close focus, but does do a good job of embedding her in her wider theatrical milieu.

In spite of Kobo's claim that I had cancelled my pre-order (on the very morning it was due to be available WOT) I have acquired KJ Charles, An Unseen Attraction and am about partway through. Just possibly the author is being a tad presentist in the characters' expressed distaste for the excesses of Victorian taxidermy - kittens stuffed and doing the sorts of things they do in Louis Wain paintings, etc?

I was also recommended (I think via [personal profile] coffeeandink, an ongoing WIP original fiction on AO3 'The Course of Honour' by Avoliot, which is charming.

Up next

Well, there's another JA Jance sitting on my ereader, plus the various Flashmans I inherited, and I'm tempted to see to what extent John Masters' Far, Far the Mountain Peak (1957), which was probably my personal favourite of his Savage family sequence, holds up.

Poem: "The Outcome of Vulnerability"

Feb. 22nd, 2017 03:25 am
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem is from the July 19, 2016 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] eseme, [personal profile] redsixwing, and [personal profile] heartsinger. It also fills the "cuddling" square in my 7-16-16 card for the [community profile] hc_bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by [livejournal.com profile] starcat_jewel. It belongs to the Antimatter and Stalwart Stan thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Warning: This poem contains some intense topics. Highlight to read the warnings, some of which are spoilers. It features homework about intimate relationships, extreme embarrassment, inconvenient-but-not-inappropriate erections, Lawrence suggesting that Stan is demisexual, Stan flibbering some more, Lawrence calling Mr. Marshall to rearrange the assignment a bit, Lawrence talking with Stuart about privacy issues, Stuart is a mensch but Stan is really about to die of embarrassment now, intimate discussions, Stan is right this is pr0n for demis, reference to animal death, reference to death in the family, painful discussion of finances, Stan's sense of self-worth has a big chink there, offstage masturbation, Lawrence is bemused by Stuart again, but Stuart is such a mensch, and other challenging stuff. But it is mostly a great big ball of gay fluff. If these are sensitive issues for you, please consider your tastes and headspace before reading onward.

Read more... )

Tuesday Yardening

Feb. 21st, 2017 11:43 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today I put mulch around 7 more shrub seedlings.  That finishes the row along the road in the savanna, other than the Canadian hemlocks that died upon planting.  One thing I'd like to try this spring is planting potted ones if I can find some at a nursery. 
ceb: (blossom)
[personal profile] ceb
Writing to peers is a bit of a faff. Well, the writing bit less so, working who to write to is the faff.

http://www.stilleu.uk/lobby-lords-brexit-bill/ is the best source of suggestions for what to write. It also has information on how to choose who to write to.

Write to a specific lord (search by name) here: https://www.theyworkforyou.com/peers/
Or use https://www.writetothem.com/lords to search by other factors - e.g. words they have mentioned in debate, or connections to a location. The other benefit of this is that you can check whether a given peer is someone who turns up to debates or not.
These both limit you to 6 emails a day (the rationale being that above that, messages will be dismissed as spam). Many peers use the general House of Commons email address and this is a convenient way to email them. The form will put in the correct form of address for you.

However, using https://www.theyworkforyou.com/peers/ you can look up email addresses, and if you find peers listing a different address, not just the HoL one, you can email them separately at that address.
http://www.parliament.uk/business/lords/whos-in-the-house-of-lords/how-to-address-a-lord/ for how to get the form of address right (NB that's Dear Lady Mobarik, frex, not Dear Lady Baroness Mobarik, not completely clear from that article).

In addition, the following are members of the government so subject to whip, and so may be less useful to write to:
Baroness Neville-Rolfe (Treasury), Baroness Williams of Trafford (HO), Baroness Joanna Shields (HO), Baroness Anelay of St Johns (FCO), Lord Keen of Elie (MoJ), Lord Nash (Education), Lord Bridges of Headley (ExEU), Lord Prior of Brampton (BIS), Lord O'Shaughnessy (Health), Lord Henley (DWP), Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Transport), Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (DCLG), Baroness Evans of Bowes Park, Lord Dunlop (Scotland), Lord Gardiner of Kimble (Biosecurity), Lord Bates (int dev), Lord Ashton of Hyde (cult), Lord Taylor of Holbeach, Earl of Courtown, Baroness Mobarik, Viscount Younger of Leckie, Lord Young of Cookham, Baroness Goldie, Baroness Buscombe, Baroness Vere of Norbiton, Lord O'Shaughnessy (all whips)

Other useful links:
https://www.crowdjustice.org/case/parliament-take-control/ "Case updates" has ideas and material they've sent to all the Lords and previous stuff they sent to MPs
https://www.bindmans.com/uploads/files/documents/UK_Parliament_EU_Citizenship_rights_booklet.pdf
http://www.crossbenchpeers.org.uk/interests.html
http://lordsoftheblog.net/
vatine: books-related stuff (books)
[personal profile] vatine
Previously unread.

This is technically a novella. At least that's what the metadata says. It is eminently readable, no matter what category of "size of work" it happens to fall in. Not exactly sure what to say about it, but the term "slow bullet" is in many ways highly plot-relevant. And anything else would probably be spoilery.

Poem: "A Bicycle Built for Three"

Feb. 21st, 2017 02:31 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem came out of the February 2017 Creative Jam. It was inspired and sponsored by [personal profile] artsyhonker. It also fills the "Love Without Limits" square in my 2-1-17 Romantic card for the Valentines Bingo fest. This poem belongs to the Cassandra thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )

Poem: "Marjorie's Baby"

Feb. 21st, 2017 01:22 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem came out of the February 2017 Creative Jam. It fills the "WILD CARD: Family Love" square in my 2-1-17 Platonic card for the Valentines Bingo fest. It has been sponsored by [personal profile] artsyhonker. This poem belongs to the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )

oursin: Julia Margaret Cameron photograph of Hypatia (Hypatia)
[personal profile] oursin

Intriguing article in Sunday's Observer which tries to get beyond the knee-jerk shock horror that there has been a demand at SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London) for the philosophy course to be a bit less dead and white - Are Soas students right to ‘decolonise’ their minds from western philosophers? - even if 'male' still seems to be the default, except for passing mentions of Hannah Arendt, one of which alludes to her as one of several influenced by Heidegger.

And I am all for being less Eurocentric, or at least considering the ways in which its being the occupation of dead white elite males affected the development of philosophy as it is taught in Institutionz of Highah Learninz, and what counts as 'philosophy' -

But I think there are questions there are who does it and what counts as part of the tradition and the canon -

- matters that I have given some thought to in other realms of endeavour, and, of course, bearing in mind the Russ cases as shown forth in How to Suppress Women's Writing of how, if a woman does achieve something, it Doesn't Really Count and it is off in its own separate (and inferior) category.

And thinking of the tendency to the construction of patriarchal genealogies of [intellectual/cultural fields] leaving out those women who were there when it was new and uninstitutionalised (Patricia Fara also pointed out the importance of non-elite male artisans and craftsmen to the Great Men of Science Making Big Important Discoveries: which is not even massively Back Then, see 'Norman Heatley was done out of the Nobel' because he was the lab assistant).

hatam_soferet: (Default)
[personal profile] hatam_soferet
The Book-dragon does not hoard gold, but rather books.

They're rare, because the egg has to be incubated for a period of years, but as soon as it hatches, the larva needs access to books. This means the egg basically needs to be in a display case in a library, or in a museum that also has a book collection. Preferably in one with a dome on top, for some reason.

In the larval stage, it resembles a cranky librarian.

Over time, it gets scalier and crustier, and it develops a long tail, in which it wraps itself whilst thinking about books.

There was one at the Bodleian, at the Radcliffe Camera, whose name was "Yiddish," and it would sit on the desk, wrap itself in its tail, flash all its teeth at people, and then give advice. That was quite a young specimen. They get larger as they grow older, and more territorial.

Copyright libraries are examples of successful book-dragon hoarding. Under the copyright library, in the long-term stacks, the mature of the species is to be found, among enormous quantities of books that will never be read. The portion of the holdings accessible to readers is the bit the dragon puts out for bait; a successful library is able to build extensive collections.

The Vatican Library has a particularly old-established dragon with the most varied and valuable hoard in the world. This may be the alpha dragon of the species.

Sometimes the dragons get vicious. The Library of Alexandria had to be burned because the dragon whose hoard it was had gone bad, and there was no other way to contain the damage. The library of the Jewish Theological Seminary is ostensibly being torn down and replaced because of Manhattan real estate, but it's actually because they suspect a feral dragon, and the damage is less if you catch them early.

Piano

Feb. 21st, 2017 10:34 am
wildeabandon: photo of me with wavy hair and gold lipstick (Default)
[personal profile] wildeabandon
I’ve been learning the piano again, and it’s giving me a great deal of pleasure. I learned for a few years as a child, but gave up when it started getting difficult, and in the last five years or so I’ve periodically gone “I should learn to play again”, made enthusiastic attempts for a couple of weeks, and then gotten bored. About a year ago, when we were preparing for a couple of singthroughs at Ardgour-en-France, I volunteered to do the easy piano version accompaniment for a couple of the songs. It took a ridiculous amount of time to get these really quite simple pieces to a non-terrible standard, but it got me back into the habit of playing regularly again, and I’ve carried on ever since.

When I moved out to Northampton I had quite a lot of time to myself, so after a little while decided to treat myself to a cheap spare piano out here, and since then I’ve been playing a lot more, and recently started taking lessons again. I’m not someone who’s naturally musically talented, but it turns out that actually practicing a reasonable amount means you get better at a reasonable rate. Who knew? I’m preparing for my grade 5 now, and having a lot of fun with the pieces (not so much fun with the scales, of which there are many, but I do seem to find it easier to be disciplined about them than I did as a youngster).

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